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14
aug

How to Present to Senior Management (9 Tips Every Executive Would Agree With)

Presenting to executives can be exciting BUT these presentations can also be pretty intimidating.

Let’s face it … senior executives can be a tough crowd:

They are often super impatient because their schedules are jam packed — and they have to make lots of high-stakes decisions, often with little time to weigh options. So, if you think upper management is going to sit still and wade through your lengthy deck with some big reveal at the end … THINK AGAIN! They’ll likely just interrupt you before you finish your deck.

Whatever your presentation is about, you won’t go very far if you haven’t prepared intensely for this moment.

That’s why the kind of slide deck you have at your disposal is just as important as your message.

As Eminem once said, you’ve got one shot, and you might not get another one, so here are nine tips to help you make a top-notch slide deck for your big upcoming executive presentation to the senior team.

Let’s get this executive party started!

1. Make THREE Key Points

When presenting to senior management you need to get to drive home your key message FAST.

While the topic you discuss is certainly nuanced and has many sub-topics meant for discussion, an executive presentation is not really the place to get into all the tiny little details.

Think about it this way:

If you had to summarize the whole meeting in three sentences, what would they be?

We’ve mentioned before that the human brain digests information more rapidly when they’re divided into nice tidy morsels of three.

So, if you can stick to three overarching talking points for your executive presentation you have a better chance of impacting your audience before they get too impatient.

Speaking of impatient senior execs, plan for the likely event that someone will hijack the meeting, talk and ask questions for most of it. Your VP didn’t get that far without being the sort of person who is decisive and inquisitive. While you might be the one at the top of the agenda, you’re not calling the shots.

That’s why having three concise points to plan your slide presentation around is so useful.

It makes it easier to stay calm and focused when you have three main points to talk about, rather than worry about remembering, say, six of them. If you go in with three points, your executive presentation is likelier to succeed because your presentation will be more organized, and also because you will be better able to keep everything on track if and when you are interrupted with questions from the higher-ups.

It’s also important that you start your presentation with a BANG and tell the executive team up front what you will be covering.

Doing this will give the senior leaders confidence that you’re going to use their time wisely. That leads us to our next point.

2. Keep your Presentation Short. Senior Executives Have Tight Schedules

Building off of the first point, you should remember that your 10:30 AM slot with your boss (or possibly the boss’s boss) is not the highlight of the day, or even possibly the week, for your audience. They might have a meeting a few hours later with the president of the company, or have some equally trying and stressful task at hand.

If they walk into your presentation and you’re rambling on a bit too much, they are not so likely to pay attention. In fact, they might start to get annoyed, which is the last thing you want.

That’s why you should keep your presentation – and your slide deck – as short as possible.

While you should expect their undivided attention as you talk to them about an issue that you have spent time and energy researching, this does not mean your slide deck should be any longer than normal.

This does not mean you skip over any important details; what it means is that you cut out everything that isn’t important. Ideally, this should give you three points to talk about. Sound familiar?

Execs are impatient, want to get to the point quickly, and are more interested in the key issues than the details. So aim to keep the deck super-short. 2-3 slides might be a crazy small number to have as a presentation in another situation, but it is not too short for an exec.

3. Be Extra Flexible

It’s common for senior executives to ask you to jump back to a previous slide or fast forward through your slides to a particular section of your presentation.

Also, don’t be surprised when executives interrupt you as you present a painstakingly crafted slide with “Got it. Next”.

An extended discussion on a particular slide may mean you need to fly through other less important slides in order to get back on track in terms of covering all of your slides.

Be ready to stop and change directions on a dime.

Heck, in some senior meetings, you may even forgo covering all of your slides because the discussion on a particular aspect of your presentation is going really well.

The key is to be FLEXIBLE and cover what they want to focus on — not necessarily what you want to. In order to achieve your objectives (e.g., more resources, budget, executive support, etc.), you may not need to go through every slide.

Here are a few tips for staying flexible during your presentation to senior management:

1) Know your PowerPoint presentation hacks so you can easily whiz through your PowerPoint deck and come across like a true presentation pro.

2) If your slide deck is running on the longer side, consider designing your presentation so that it has a “Prezi-like” choose your own adventure format. This will allow you to jump to specific sections of a presentation faster than Harry Potter can waive his magic wand.

3) Keep your supporting backup material on hand in case you need to reference something. That leads us to our next point.

4. Be Prepared to Back Up Your Arguments with Supporting Data When Necessary

So, thick presentation decks are the bane of a busy exec’s existence. How do you get around the fact that certain details, especially if you have a lot of data to share, might be referenced over the course of your presentation?

That’s where the “thunk factor” comes in. The “thunk” is the sound a heavy presentation printout makes when you put it on your boss’s desk.

During your executive presentation, you have to be prepared to answer any of the exec’s follow up questions with appendix material. While you might have a super short slide deck with just a couple of slides, this doesn’t mean you have to come shorthanded.

If you have important data to share with your audience, or maybe you have field or case studies that would prove useful to reference, you can supply everyone with a printout that carries your supporting data.

Don’t make the mistake of not being able to answer a senior exec’s question during your presentation. Executives are gifted at finding holes in your logic or content. They want to be sure you understand the consequences and implications, and that they can trust your analysis and recommendations.

5. WOW the Senior Team with Creative Visuals, Charts, Diagrams, and More

Like everyone else, execs don’t like boring slide decks!

There’s no reason to give someone a page full of numbers when you can just as well conceptualize it beautifully.

Diagrams help execs to speed-read and get a quick picture of what’s going on. Get creative with how you tell the story of your presentation.

Here are a few ideas for diagrams that will help you communicate the sometimes complex story of the numbers to your not-always-savvy boss:

Pie charts are a classic standby for showing what percentage of the market your company might have, but maybe you can try something a bit less routine. Maybe create a diagram with a colored map of your market, with different color saturations representing greater share.

Flow charts are a fun albeit sometimes messy way of showing cause and effect, like what happens between when a potential customer first signs up for your company’s new product through a blog campaign. Make sure that if you do use flow charts to highlight the most important points, you don’t necessarily have to keep things linear, but you might want to avoid getting as crazy as this flow chart.

Timelines are useful if, for example, you are introducing a new sales plan or major software implementation to your directors or other executive team. The timeline should feature the major dates, if applicable, for scheduled rollouts, and should set tangible milestones which can later be used to judge progress. Ultimately, a good timeline can help you set the baseline for whether or not your project will be deemed a success, so that is why it is a very useful diagram to include in your appendix material.

Pie charts, flow charts, timelines, and maps are just a few of the many outstanding methods for diagramming context to quickly educate executives on the entire situation — and they like it that way. Look for ways to convert text and data into diagrams that show how all the parts fit together.

Need some help designing charts, timelines, and other awesome looking slides for an upcoming presentation to senior management? Our professional “Influencer” presentation template has over 200 delicious slides that you can download to your computer instantly.

Make your executive team love you forever and get your copy now.

6. Keep Your Text Short to Make Your Points Quickly

Of course, sometimes you have to write things down, and diagramming simply will not do. Obviously your tool of choice, if it’s not diagrams, are words. When you do have to write, we’ve said before that you should do everything you can to be as concise as possible.

Here are some really useful executive presentation tips to keep in mind when you are brainstorming the display text to use in your slide deck:

1) Execs think fast, process fast, and hate having their time wasted, so write text to enable speed-reading and quick understanding of the thought at hand.

2) Use short phrases and elaborate on them verbally. You should utilize bullet point lists whenever possible, and place each talking point on a separate line. That way, your ideas naturally organize themselves in a manner which is visually easier to process and comprehend. As communications coach Carmine Gallo says, you need to “think twitter like headlines!”

3) A really good tip for writing concisely is to avoid using passive voice. For example, don’t say “market share will increase by 25% because of our marketing plan.” Instead, say “our marketing plan will increase market share by 25%.” Using active instead of passive voice will cut down on fluffy words, which saves vital space on your slide. It also the wonderful effect of making you sound more confident and certain about yourself.

Lastly, another method for dropping a few words is to eliminate basic articles, including “the,” “on,” “and,” and so on.

One of the cardinal sins of any PowerPoint presentation is writing in complete sentences.

For the love of humanity, don’t put full sentences on slides — it slows the presentation down.

Even worse, you will probably end up reading the sentence aloud, which looks and sounds terrible and certainly won’t win you any points with your audience. Longer, wordier sentences are definitely a no-no and should be avoided at all costs.

Hopefully that’s not news to you, but it never hurts to remind people that they should stay away from writing in full sentences. If you can keep your diction short, punchy, and to the point, your executive presentation stands a great chance of leaving your audience with a positive impact.

7. Pay Extra Attention to Slide Hygiene

Executives have high standards — for themselves and others — and quite often are perfectionists when it comes to their work.

They expect the same from you.

Before you deliver your big executive presentation, make a checklist to verify that your slide comes across as crisp and coordinated.

What are some examples of the presentation design errors that drive senior managers crazy?

Spelling errors are totally unacceptable, and considering that Microsoft Word comes with Spellcheck and browser extensions such as Grammarly point out basic spelling mistakes, you have no excuses for the dreaded red spellcheck underlining any of your text (except for company names and jargon, of course).

Don’t forget that even the best spellchecker will fail to detect homonyms such as they’re/their or where/were. There’s a time and a place for making those sorts of silly spelling switches, but an executive presentation isn’t one of them.

Grammar errors such as inconsistently placing a period at the end of one sentence but omitting it in the next one are to be avoided. Pick one style and follow through the whole way. The same goes for header weight and size; don’t switch from bold size 16 font on one slide to normal size 16 the next. In a similar vein, avoid inconsistent capitalization in slide titles, different bullets points on different slides, or switched fonts.

Lastly, one of the most annoying problems that creep up from time to time when you are creating a PowerPoint presentation are formatting issues. For example, it’s terribly annoying when for some strange reason the margins are not all completely even, or when you press enter to skip a line but the gap between lines of text is mysteriously larger below than above.

Pay attention to these sorts of little details because the exec is. If you are pitching yourself to lead a bold new project that moves the company in a different direction, how confident do you think an exec will feel if your slide has an annoying tendency to have inconsistent spacing? Don’t give them an excuse to say no to you!

8. Craft a Stunning Presentation

Obviously, as a PowerPoint presentation design website, we’re always going on about how when it comes to design, less is usually more.

It’s so important that your audience is able to focus directly on you and your ideas. A slide deck that is too visually interruptive or busy with images, fonts or colors that compete with each other is not a winning executive presentation pitch.

You know a lot, or you wouldn’t be invited to the meeting. But resist the urge to throw it all up on your slides.

Here’s a few pointers for creating simple yet beautiful slides for executives:

1) Use clean visuals that represent your message with a few key points per slide.

2) Carefully craft meaningful headings that could tell the story on its own. A punch box at the bottom to reinforce your point can also be quite useful. If you can’t come up with a punchy summarizing statement, consider if you really need that slide.

3) As mentioned in tip #1, harness the power of three!

4) Create a consistent theme of colors, fonts, and layout

5) Make sure your slides pass the “glance test” – people should understand your slide in less than three seconds

Of course, these are just a few tips. For a complete arsenal of presentation design tips and resources that will turn you into a PowerPoint pro click here.

9. Know Your Audience

When it comes to presenting to the senior team knowing your audience is an absolute MUST:

How much do the senior team members know about your topic? (i.e., how much time should you spend on providing background information?)

What topics are hot buttons or particularly interesting to the executives based on their current business goals?

Which senior execs would be politically threatened by your recommendations?

What can you find out about their pet peeves or preferences?

So, how do you find out the answers to these questions you might ask?

You need to find an insider who can coach you on how to best present your material to the targeted executive or group of executives.

That person could perhaps be:

* Your boss or executive sponsor

* One of the executive’s direct reports

* An executive’s admin assistant

You’re looking for inside information on your audience so that you can avoid derailing your presentation and wasting everyone’s time.

Conclusion

Ultimately, it’s up to you to make the call when it comes to compiling the best possible slide deck for your upcoming presentation to senior management. This is the sort of opportunity that probably does not come around very often, so prep hard, nail down your three main talking points, keep your slides concise, come equipped with a useful printout full of nifty diagrams to accompany your presentation, and keep your slide design about as conservative as your dress code.

Other than that, don’t forget to smile and be yourself. And maybe give ‘em a firm handshake – that always helps!

I’d love to hear your upper management presentation success stories and what valuable lessons you have learned along the way. If you’re a senior executive, I’d love to hear your perspective as well.

Lastly, do you have a friend that could benefit from learning about these tips for presenting to senior executives? If so, email them the link to this post.

Thanks for sharing and be sure to post this article on Twitter of Facebook as well (by using the sharing buttons to the left).

Finally, if you are looking to create a top quality executive presentation, don’t forget to check out our excellent Influencer slide template deck, and check out some of these other great blog posts in our archive to learn more about creating the perfect presentation.

Photo Credits: iphone calendar by idownloadblog.com

01
aug

Start Your Presentation With a Bang and Hook Your Audience in Less Than 2 Minutes (With Examples)

Wouldn’t it be great if every single audience member you present to was hooked right from the beginning and unable to pull their eyes away from you and your PowerPoint deck?

I think we both know the answer to that question.

To achieve this goal, you must master the art of starting your presentation like a pro.

Wait a second, you may be thinking. Giving introductions? Isn’t that kind of a small detail when giving presentations?

The answer is no. Your presentation introduction is not a small detail.

The introduction to your PowerPoint presentation is often the difference between engaging your audience and having them quickly excuse themselves to go catch Pokémons on their smartphones.

Think about it. If you don’t grab your audience’s attention right away, you’ll lose them.

You just spent all that time creating an amazing presentation. You did a ton of research and spent countless hours perfecting your slides and making sure there are no errors.

But if your intro SUCKS, your efforts will be all for nothing.

In other words, you lost before you even got started!

If you want to give great presentations and keep your audience hooked, you must master the art of starting your presentation with a bang!

Let me give you some tips and examples on how to do this.

1.) Start Your Presentation With a Stellar Opening Line

To have a strong presentation intro, you need to open with a strong first sentence.

The first sentence that comes out of your mouth has one single purpose: to entice your audience members to want to keep listening. In doing so, it sets the tone for the rest of the presentation.

If you don’t get this right, you audience’s minds will start to wander (e.g., what they’re having for lunch, what’s on HBO tonight, etc.)

So what does a great opening line look like?

Here’s an example from Gary Vaynerchuk’s TED talk “Do What You Love. No Excuses”:

“Let’s start with PASSION. There are way too many people in this room right now who are doing stuff they hate.”

Why is the above such a great opening line? Because it makes people want to know more:

Am I one of those people?

How can I get started doing something that I love?

What did Gary learn about how to live with passion?

Vaynerchuk nailed it with his opening line. He drew us in by making us ask questions.

If you don’t know how to craft an intriguing first sentence, the remaining 20 minutes (or however long your talk is) of your presentation could be a complete waste.

Luckily for you, with a few simple methods, writing a phenomenal first sentence can be quite easy:

The first thing to keep in mind is that you want to keep the first sentence short. This makes it easy for your audience to digest the first bits of information and prevents them from losing interest quickly.

But there is more to it than that.

You have to make sure that the first sentence grabs your audience’s attention and holds it for the rest of the presentation.

Ask Your Audience a Question

An easy way to get your audience’s attention and get them engaged is to ask them a simple question.

For example, if I were giving a talk on “How to Design Amazing Presentations,” I might consider opening with the following question:

“Did you know that people are incredible at remembering pictures?”

Now, why does the above question work?

It has to do with the brain’s “reward system.”

The brain’s reward system lights up when curiosity is piqued.

When this system is activated, dopamine (the stuff that gives us reward and pleasure) is released.

When we are intrigued by a question (i.e., experience a sense of curiosity) the limbic reward system lights up. And that’s why we want to keep listening and paying attention … it’s rewarding to satisfy curiosity.

That’s why a question is a great opening line. You can even use the question as the title of your presentation.

Tell a Short Story

The brain also gets energized when it encounters a story.

According to the theory of neural coupling, certain portions of the brain are activated when a reader thinks about the same mental and physical activity that a character in a story is doing.

Influential speaker Tony Robbins often starts his presentations with a story, often a true story:

“When I was 17, I went out on Thanksgiving, it was my target for years to have enough money to feed two families. The most fun and moving thing I ever did in my life. Next year, I did four, then eight. I didn’t tell anybody what I was doing, I wasn’t doing it for brownie points. But after eight, I thought I could use some help. So I went out, got my friends involved, then I grew companies, got 11, and I built the foundation. 18 years later, I’m proud to tell you last year we fed 2 million people in 35 countries through our foundation. All during the holidays, Thanksgiving, Christmas, in different countries around the world.”

The story makes his audience members interested and keeps them hooked to the very end.

Provide An Attention Grabbing Quote

Another great way to start your presentation introduction is to use an attention-grabbing quote.

Let’s say you are giving a presentation on “innovation.” A great way to introduce the presentation would be to use a quote from Albert Einstein:

“A person who never made a mistake never tried anything new.”

When giving your quote you may want to consider the following two methods:

1) Include the quote in your PowerPoint deck. When doing this you may also want to consider including an image of the person who said the quote or some other relevant image that illustrates what the quote is about.

2) Going to a blank screen (Control +B or Control +W). This bring all the attention to you and prevent any distractions.

Either of these options work great when providing your quote.

Share An Interesting Fact About Your Topic

In an age when the Internet is abundant with crappy information and fraudulent “gurus,” people are skeptical. They have every reason to be.

It’s often a great idea to start your presentation with some cold hard  facts or stats.

Here’s another example of some stats I might use if I was giving a talk about presentation design:

“According to Dr. John Medina, if people hear a piece of information three days later they will remember only 10% of it. However, if you a picture and people will remember 65%.”

Opening your presentation with a relevant fact or statistic is a great way to establish trust and authority from the first sentence and let readers know you’ve done your research.

2.) Hold Your Audience’s Attention by Having Something Unique to Say After Your Opening Line

Alright, so you’ve come up with an awesome opening line, and you have your audience’s attention. Good job! Give yourself a pat on the back!

Now what?

Now, you have to hold that interest by having something unique to say.

If you want to have the audience’s respect and attention, you have to say something they’ve never heard before.

Going back to my example of giving a presentation on how to create amazing presentations.

Here’s an example:

“How would you like to learn how to design presentations so exciting that your audience will be sitting on the edge of their seats with excitement?

That would be pretty epic, right?

Well, this is entirely possible, and in today’s presentation, I am going to share with you the tips and tricks of how to do exactly that.  

It’s not by staying up late every night or spending thousands of dollars on professional presentation designers either.

I am going to show you how you can create presentations that rock by giving you tons of smart resources, and using little known design secrets that most presentation designers don’t want you to know about!

Sound’s awesome? Let’s get to it.”

It’s hard to be different. I realize that.

Sometimes, in order to create unique stuff, we simply have to work harder, think longer, and do more research than our competitors.

Here are some ways you can develop that unique voice in your presentation intro:

Share a personal story or fact

You’re the only you there is. You can share a story or experience no one else can. One way to tell such a story is to write, “If you know me…”

Here’s a great example from influential speaker Scott Harrison:

“In 2004, I left the streets of New York City for the shores of West Africa. I’d made my living for years in the big Apple promoting top nightclubs and fashion events, for the most part living selfishly and arrogantly. Desperately unhappy, I needed to change. Faced with spiritual bankruptcy, I wanted desperately to revive a lost Christian faith with action and asked the question: What would the opposite of my life look like?”

Notice how you become instantly hooked after reading the above.

Get your emotions in it

People have an emotional reaction to emotions. When we convey our emotions in our writing, people tend to respond. Tony Robbins is a master of getting emotional during presentations. He even talks about it in one of his speaking engagements:

“Information without emotion is not retained. You need to be in the moment and flexible to make it real and raw.”

A good way to insert emotion into your talk is to practice in front of a mirror. Don’t memorize entire sentences verbatim, so that way when you give the talk it sounds a bit more natural – not to mention, the more salient points of the talk will really jump out at you as you go through your paces during your presentation

Share your goals or vision

If you have a guiding goal or vision for life, you can communicate this in your introduction. “That’s one of the reasons I wrote this post. My goal in life is to…”

Make a promise

A promise is a personal and attention-grabbing thing. Give your readers a promise, and it will secure their loyalty and their interest. “I promise that I’ll do my dead-level best to….”

Unique isn’t easy. But it’s worth it.

2.) Make Sure Your Presentation Introduction is Extra Simple

The world is moving so fast these days that most people have an attention span of only a few seconds.

Apparently, our attention span is getting shorter!

After a few seconds, we get bored and move on to the next shiny object.

If you want your audience members to make time in their days to listen to what you have to say, make sure you present things as simply as possible.

Longer presentations, of course, deserve slightly longer introductions. But it’s important to respect people’s time and attention.

This means you need to avoid rambling and dive straight into your amazing slides.

3.) Use the Word “You” and Speak Directly to Your Audience

Whenever you are giving a presentation, you want to use the word “you” as much (and as naturally) as possible.

In this article, I’ve used some variation of the word you more than 100 times. Why? Because I’m talking to you! I want you to know this information. I want you to benefit from it.

By emphasizing the word “you” in your presentation, you let your audience know that you are directly addressing them and their situation and not just giving a generic talk to the general populace.

But there’s another side to this. I should refer to myself as well. My goal is to convey a personal feel to this article. After all, it’s me talking to you, right? So it’s only natural that I would refer to myself too.

4.) Tell Your Audience What Your Presentation is About

The point of an introduction is exactly that: to introduce the content that will be presented in an article.

I cannot tell you the number of times PowerPoint presentations have left me confused even after the presenter has gone through 5 or more slides.

Take a moment to explain what your presentation is going to cover without giving away too many details.

Here is a great example from a Ted Talk from Seth Godin

“Today, I’m going to give you four specific examples, I’m going to cover at the end about how a company called Silk tripled their sales; how an artist named Jeff Koons went from being a nobody to making a whole bunch of money and having a lot of impact; to how Frank Gehry redefined what it meant to be an architect. And one of my biggest failures as a marketer in the last few years — a record label I started that had a CD called “Sauce.”

This will build suspense around the subject matter while still letting your audience know what they may be in for.

5.) Explain the Importance of Your Presentation

Once you’ve explained what the article is, now it’s time to explain why people should care.

Everyone on the Internet approaches every new piece of information with a simple question: “What’s in it for me?”

If you want to write introductions that hook the reader and help your content go viral, you have to master the art of explaining what the reader stands to gain from the information you are sharing—the benefits.

How will it benefit your readers’ lives? How will it solve a problem they are facing? How will it cure a pain they are feeling?

Here’s a great example from influential speaker Tim Ferriss where he tells people what he wants them to take away from the presentation:

And that’s what I want everyone in here to feel like, the Incredible Hulk, at the end of this presentation. More specifically, I want you to feel like you’re capable of becoming an excellent long-distance swimmer, a world-class language learner, and a tango champion.”

If you understand how to quickly and efficiently answer these questions, you’ll keep your readers glued to your article till the last word.

Conclusion

Few things can make or break your presentation as easily as an introduction.

If you can master the art of kicking off your presentation like a pro, you’ll be able to increase audience engagement, improve sales, and earn a reputation as an incredible speaker.

It’s not an easy skill to master, but like many things in the world of giving presentations, it’s fairly straightforward.

If you put in the work, you’ll get results.

Here’s my question for you …

What tactics do you use to start a presentation introduction?

Lastly, do you have a friend that could benefit from learning about how to start a presentation? If so, email them the link to this post.

Thanks for sharing and be sure to post this article on Twitter, LinkedIn, Facebook or your other favorite social media spot using the sharing buttons to the left!

Image Credits

Gary Vaynerchuck by Josh Hallet, Tony Robbins by Steve Jurvetson, Seth Godin by Simone Brunozzi, Tim Feriss by The Next Web, Scott Harisson by Silicon Prairie News

PowerPoint Tips and Tricks - Presentation tips - Check out my ebook Slides Made Slimple Now!

 

18
jul

13 “Must Have” Slides To Include In an Investor Pitch Deck (With Awesome Examples!)

The doors are closed, everyone’s sitting around the conference room table, notepads out, coffee in hand.

This is a moment you’ve been preparing for months now. The chance to raise capital for your business and start down the road to success …

But first you have to pitch the investors.

How do you get potential investors excited about your business idea and engage them in a conversation about funding?

If you’re raising money for your business, having an impressive investor pitch deck is perhaps the key component in your fundraising toolkit.

You wouldn’t play baseball without a bat, or paint a picture without a canvas, would you?

Having a winning investor presentation deck on hand is no different.

If there was ever a time to develop a beautiful presentation it would be for your investor pitch deck. If your pitch deck design sucks, what sort of message does that send about your idea?

People won’t trust you can deliver the goods.

To make sure that investors ask for more, not just show you to the door, you need a kickass startup pitch deck that makes the case for your business. Today we’re going to talk about 13 “must have” slides that are essential to any winning investor pitch.

Let’s get started!

Pitch Deck Slide #1 – Vision and Value Proposition – Your elevator pitch in a slide

Thanks to Twitter and memes, pretty much everyone these days is familiar with the art of writing out complex ideas in a short amount of words. Of course, not everyone is very good at this, but you’ve already made it this far!

A quick one sentence overview of your business that proposes the value that you provide to your customers is an essential start to any winning investor deck presentation.

Think about this slide like you approach scrawling out a 140 character tweet, and try to sum it up in a way that your parents (or anyone else who isn’t a technophile) would understand.

One common approach that tech companies make with the value proposition is by comparing their enterprise to another well-known company. For example, you see many pitches that start with things like:

“We’re the Uber for Coffee”

“We’re like Yelp but for Movies”

Drawing these comparisons can help, but just make sure that your comparison makes sense and you’re not just name dropping a big name company like “Uber” to signify growth potential. Your business model has to truly be similar to the company you drawing a comparison to.

The other issue to keep in mind when you make this sort of value proposition is that while a major brand can simplify things, people will automatically envision your app/company/idea working in exactly the same way. So it’s important to distinguish as you go through with your presentation how you follow Netflix or Uber’s model but also explain how things might be different.

Pitch Deck Slide #2 – Introduction – Tell people who you are and why you are here

Besides your name and what you’re doing in front of a group of investors, there’s not really much that needs to be said as far as introductions are concerned. If you’re proposing a new app to make travel bookings easier and you once spent a year backpacking around the world, that might be a relevant bit of information to include in your bio.

If it isn’t relevant, cut it out!

A great pitch deck doesn’t have more; it has less. Nowhere is that more true than your intro slide.

Pitch Deck Slide #3 – Target Market Opportunity – Here is the addressable market and the prospects who will buy your product

Once you’ve introduced yourself to your potential investors, it’s time to explain the most important part of your company and the reason why it exists in the first place: your customers!

Use this slide to expand on who your ideal customer is and how many of them there are. Do they live in urban areas on the coasts? How many of them hold college degrees? What is the total market size and how do you position your company within the market? If you can find the data, investors will want to know how much people or businesses currently spend in the market to get a sense of the total market size.

This is where you tell the story about the scope and scale of the problem you are solving.

If it makes sense for your business, you’ll want to divide your market into segments that you will address with different types of marketing and perhaps different types of product offerings.

Be careful with this slide, though. It’s tempting to try and define your market to be as large as possible. Instead, investors will want to see that you have a very specific and reachable market. The more specific you are, the more realistic your pitch will be.

When you’re looking for a brilliant investor pitch presentation, make sure that it includes easy-to-edit graphics which your audience can look at and instantly understand the data being shown.

Influencer Presentation Template gives your audience a few nifty graphics to include when you talk about your market share and how you’re targeting your customer base.

Pitch Deck Slide #4 – Problems and Solutions – Define the problems people have, and solutions you offer to relieve this pain

If there was no such thing as rain, there would be no need for umbrellas. No problem, no solution waiting to solve it.

If you aren’t solving some problem in the world, you are going to have a long uphill climb with your business. But you’ve no doubt identified a real problem on the market, and it just so happens that you’ve found a solution.

Use this slide to talk about the problem you are solving and who has the problem. This section of your investor pitch deck should tell your audience how it’s raining, and you’ve got one hell of an umbrella to keep them dry. You can talk about the current solutions in the market, but don’t spend too much time on the competitive landscape on this slide—you’ll have a chance to do that on a later slide.

Doing some market research (focus groups, 1v1 interviews, online surveys, etc.) is a great way to learn about the problems your target customers face. The more you can show you understand your customers issues the better.

When talking about your problem focus on a story that people can relate to.

The more you can make investors feel a personal connection to your problem (or somebody else’s problem), the more they will get your business and what you are trying to accomplish. A good slide for this section should explain the problem and solution in 3-5 different steps, and it might be a good idea to include icons adjacent to each talking point when you’re putting it together.

You may also want to include some customer testimonials talking about their initial frustrations and the happiness your product or service has brought to them.

Pitch Deck Slide #5 – Product – Briefly describe your product and benefits it provides to potential customers

Once you have outlined the problem and solution to your potential investors, it’s time to explain to them how your product will change everything.

Ideally, this slide should have a combination of relatable stock image, a mockup (especially if you’re selling an app), and a few major talking points that sum up how your product addresses the problem discussed in the previous slide.

You’ll be tempted to move this slide closer to the beginning of your pitch deck – don’t do that! This is classic story telling at its best; dramatically build up the problem and describe how bad it is for lots of people:

Then, Volia: Now your product or service is coming to the rescue!

Most startups pay a lot of attention on their product when instead they need to be focused on their customers and the problems those customers face. By keeping your investor pitch deck focused on your customers you will tell a more impactful story.

Pitch Deck Slide #6- Business/Revenue Model – How your business strategy is going to make your investors lots of money

Once you have provided lots of exciting info on your amazing product or service, you need to go into some detail on how this is going to bring in the cash!

After all, investors do like being paid back!

For example, will your customers pay a one-time payment to use your service or are there various monthly pricing models available?

It’s important to go into some details here.

The best way to lay all of these ideas out in one slide is to include some sort of sequential layout with icons and text, so that it’s easy for investors to see how you go from A to B and make money along the way.

Pitch Deck Slide #7 – Status and Milestones – Where you are in terms of product delivery, and specify the next key milestones

If you already have sales or early adopters using your product, talk about those accomplishments on this slide

Investors want know that your business model is sound and has already worked at some stage.

I’m sure you have seen this on any Shark Tank episode when the sharks light up with excitement that the product being introduced has already brought in a significant volume of sales.

Any proof you have that validates your solution is extremely powerful.

For example, if you’ve already had five thousand users download your beta version and thirty percent of them said they would sign up for an enterprise edition down the road, this would be a great time to bring that up!

You can also use this time to talk about your accomplishments:

What big milestones have you achieved so far and what are the major next steps you plan on taking?

A product or company roadmap that outlines key milestones is helpful here.

A great design pitch deck should have at least one of these slides, if not two – and they don’t need to be fancy. Notice how in the layout above, you can have an image with a couple bullet points to outline your status and milestones.

Pitch Deck Slide #8 – Marketing and Sales Strategy – How you reach your customers and get them to sign up

Marketing is one of the most important points in your investor pitch deck. No matter how good your product is, if you can’t sell it then you will fail – and no VC is going to give you a penny.

That’s why you should have a slide that explains how you reach your customers and get them to sign up. A slick infographic like the one you see above is a cool way to do explain the sometimes-complex levels of a sales and marketing funnel in one slide. Each step should have a corresponding icon with a short blurb of text that describes the marketing process for your company.

Targeting and winning over customers can sometimes be the biggest challenge for a new company.

That’s why it’s important to demonstrate that you know how to reach your customers and what sales channels you plan on using.

If your marketing and sales process is different than your competitors, it’s important to highlight that here.

Pitch Deck Slide #9 – Team – Make investors believe in the people behind your company

Why are you and your team the right people to build and grow this company? What experience do you have that others don’t? Highlight the key team members, their successes at other companies, and the key expertise that they bring to the table.

Even if you don’t have a complete team yet, identify the key positions that you still need to fill and why those positions are critical to company growth. For example, if you plan on expanding into direct sales but don’t have a head of B2B sales, let investors know. Even if you don’t have a hire yet, it shows that you have a plan and the ambition to reach your lofty goals.

The best investor pitch deck always has a slide that explains why your management team – from your CTO to your Creative Director – is strong and more than capable of paying back the investment. You should include headshots of the key members of your team and a sentence or two (max) describing their roles and importance to your company.

Pitch Deck Slide #10 – Financials – Explain your company’s financial health

OK, don’t actually show your financials off here. In-depth spreadsheets are difficult to read and absolutely the worst idea to include in an investor pitch presentation. Limit yourself to charts that show sales, total customers, total expenses, and profits.

You should be prepared to discuss the underlying assumptions that you’ve made to arrive at your sales goals and what your key expense drivers are.

Remember to try and be realistic. Investors see “hockey stick” projections all the time and will mentally be cutting your projections in half. If you can explain your growth based on traction you already have or compared to similar company in a related industry, that is extremely useful.

The slide you use to explain your financial situation should ideally be an infographic and give a bird’s eye view of your financials. Save the actual docs for a more secure environment and keep them in a virtual data room if investors would like to see the nitty-gritty bottom line.

Pitch Deck Slide #11 – Competition – Show who you’re competing against and explain how you’re better

Lebron has Steph Curry. Rocky had everyone from Clubber Lang to Ivan Drago. Your business has its rivals too; sometimes one, sometimes more.

Even if you are opening up an entirely new market, your potential customers are using alternative solutions to solve their problems today. So you need to describe how you fit into the competitive landscape and how you’re different than the competitors and alternatives that are on the market today.

What key advantages do you have over the competition? What “secret sauce” do you have that others don’t?

The key here is explaining how you are different than the other players on the market and why customers will choose you instead of one of the other players on the market. A side-by-side comparison of you versus the Stephen Curry’s and Kevin Durant’s of your world is a good way to show investors how you stack up.

Pitch Deck Slide #12 – Investment – In this slide you should define what kind of investment you are looking for and how you are planning to deploy it to meet the specified milestones

Finally, it’s time to actually ask for dough!

That’s why you’re creating this awesome investor presentation, correct? At some point your potential investors will want to know how much money you want

That’s why you need to be able to explain why you need the amount of money you are asking for and how you plan on using the money. Investors will want to know how their money is being used and how it is going to help you achieve the goals you are setting out for your business.

If you already have some investors on board, now is when you should be talking about those other investors and why they chose to invest.

This investor pitch slide is a bit tricky, but this tree infographic is actually a really neat way to detail the various uses for investor capital you have in mind. Will you hire more developers? Rent a bigger office space? Order premium bean bag chairs for all your employees? Best to leave that last one out, but you should visualize your hopes for investment in this slide.

Pitch Deck Slide #13 – Contact – Don`t forget to leave your contact details for investors to reach you quickly

Well, this one is pretty obvious. By the time you finish your investor pitch presentation, hopefully you’ve really given them something serious to think about. Include a final slide with relevant contact information and then cross your fingers and hope for the best!

Conclusion

There are some pretty obvious things you should include in your investor pitch deck, so hopefully you know now what works and what doesn’t. We hope that you’ve liked the sample slides we’ve included here, so the next time you have an investor pitch you come equipped with a stellar looking deck that has all the right information and looks great too.

What pitch deck do you plan on using the next time you have a round of funding come up? We’d love to know! Don’t forget, Influencer makes a perfect investor presentation pitch deck – you can get it here on Graphic River.

Lastly, do you have a friend that could benefit from learning about these presentation tips? If so, email them the link to this post.

Thanks for sharing and be sure to post this article on Twitter of Facebook as well (by using the sharing buttons to the left).

PowerPoint Tips and Tricks - Presentation tips - Check out my ebook Slides Made Slimple Now!

14
feb

This Beautiful PowerPoint Template Will Make You STAND OUT! Introducing Influencer … Panda’s Premier Presentation Template!

 

Greetings, Presentation Pandas! As you know, we’ve been talking about the benefits of professional presentation templates for a long time. Like ballroom dancing, football touchdown celebrations, and Italian sports cars, sometimes presentations need to look fancy, which is when a professional template can really come in handy.

Here are some of the things the best powerpoint templates on the market have to offer:

Save Loads of Time – With a professional template, you can focus more on honing your message and less on building a template framework. Leave the design part to the designers.

Elegant Design – The templates are clean, minimal, and look amazing. That’s EXACTLY what you should be focusing on when you create a presentation.

100% Customizable – A good presentation template is easy to customize. Simply add your text and swap out any images, graphics, or colors that you do not want. It should always be that easy.

Designed for PowerPoint – A good templates is designed to be edited directly in PowerPoint. You do not need any additional software.

Clever Animations Included – Even the best PowerPoint template in the world can look a bit amateur without some slick animations. A good template features custom animations built right into it. And if you decide that animations are not ideal for your presentation, you can easily remove them.

Customer Support – If you ever have any questions about a template you should be able to talk to the person who designed it. Whereas if you design a presentation yourself, you don’t really have anyone else who can help you (unless you’re lucky enough to have an intern you can boss around!) All you need to do is leave a comment and the person who designed the template will get back to you quickly.

At this point you must be wondering where this is all going; after all, we have recommended several of the best PowerPoint templates around over the years. But still our team of Panda’s felt a strong yearning to create our own MAGICAL template that could take your presentations to the next level. So after many a day and night of diligent work, many cups of coffee, and a veritable landfill’s worth of trash bins overflowing with scrapped designs, we have finally developed a professional presentation template that truly rocks! 

Were calling this amazing template Influencer. Click here to download your copy right now!

In this article, we’re going to explain exactly what this template offers, why it ROCKS and why you need to download it right away to use for pretty much every presentation you will ever make it again.

Are you excited? We sure are! Let’s get started!

How about a video to kick things off …

And now let’s run through the key features of the Influencer PowerPoint Template

200 Uniquely Crafted PowerPoint Slides

 

Variety is the spice of life, and it’s also critical for creating awesome looking PowerPoint slides. Who wants to see the same boring layout on every single slide? A lot of love and tender care went into making each and every slide–we developed 200 unique slides for you to pick and choose from!!

Yes, we just said 200 slides!

Without coming off as clichéd and overly hyperbolic, the possibilities are pretty much endless. Obviously your next presentation is not going to be 200 slides (or at least we hope not) but we wanted to give you a complete arsenal of good looking slides that you can pick and choose from. We put in a crazy amount of hours to make sure that each and every slide you choose rocks!

There are 12 well organized sections in total; here’s a rundown of what you can expect from each section:

Introduction – Make a positive first impression with an eye-popping display of your company name and logo. Impress your audience with the mission statement template, featuring a half-screen image with your company’s M.O. Or you can include some really cool slides such as a statement from your CEO or a really cool chronological post showing your company’s timeline of growth from past until present.

Team – Show off the members of your team (even if it’s just a team of one) with split screen bio pages that feature headshots of individual members on one side and their accolades, career background, and achievements on the other. You can also include bio pages with multiple team members listed and small bio blurbs beneath each member’s headshot, such as “Bob Smith, Accounting” or “Suzy Jones, Fantasy football junkie and baker extraordinaire.”

Services – You can’t successfully pitch investors or your next big client without talking about what sort of services your company brings to the table. We offer you multiple templates that break down your services in a DYNAMIC manner with the inclusion of customizable infographics. Or you can go for a more informal “what we do” slide that lists your services bullet-style.

Devices – If you are selling a product of some kind, there’s a good chance that it’s an app or other kind of software that runs on a specific device. So we’ve included templates that show off how your app works while running on a smartphone, or how Bluetooth connectivity is part of the package. Yeah, we pretty much thought of everything.

Customer Analysis – If it is really important for your presentation to talk about who your customers are and what sort of demographics they come from, you will really appreciate these slides. The customer segment profile shows a typical customer and features lots of cool icons jutting out of her—kind of like the guy from that classical children’s game “operation,” but without listing parts of human anatomy.

Portfolio – For agencies or firms that need to include case studies or examples of their work, this section gives you lots of predesigned templates that show off what your team has already accomplished for previous clients. Nothing sells better than experience!

Charts & Tables – Inevitably, you will have to include data in your presentation. That’s why we included templates that show off quantifiable information in a way that –for once!—isn’t boring and stale. All of our graphs are super easy to edit and can be changed directly in PowerPoint.

Business Analytics – You gotta be able to show off what sort of things you do; those numbers are really important, but they should look good when you do it. We have provided slick templates that can be easily edited to include the data that backs up your business.

Infographics – Everyone loves a good infographic! We came up with tons of really cool ones. A competitor analysis infographic features a honeycomb-shaped graph with alternating colored panels that give away little tidbits of data.

Project Management – Our project management slides help you break down the different ways that your team tackles your work. Beautiful background images combined with simple step-by-step breakdowns help you illustrate how your team will get the job done.

Maps – If you want to include the location of your office near the end of your slide or if it’s important to include map features in your presentation, we’ve given you plenty of sleek looking maps to choose from.

Closing & Other – It’s just as important to go out with a bang as it is to start with one, so we have designed powerful closing slides that feature strong customizable CTAs and inspiring images to convince your audience that you are the right choice for them. We have also included plenty of “bonus slides” including multiple title slide variations.

 

Size Formats 16:9 and 4:3

Responsive design is a touchstone of so much that goes into making everything from apps to websites to PowerPoint slides these days. That is why we created templates in two different size formats, so that when you go about the process of setting up your slideshow, you will not have to worry that your sizing is off. Nothing ruins presentations like having slides that are not the proper dimensions for the projector or TV monitor they are being displayed on! You have two options when it comes to size formatting:

16:9, or widescreen. This is becoming the standard for presentations and is actually the default size in PowerPoint. So I imagine that most people will prefer to work with this size format. You will be able to better maximize the dimensions of the media you use in your presentation, which will look so much better. This will look good on any kind of screen, from your laptop to a full-size 52” monitor in the company conference room.

4:3, or square. If you plan on handing out copies of your slide to members of your audience, this is an ideal size. For people who need to print their slides on normal 8.5” x 11” paper this format is preferable as it fills the page better and is a little less awkward than using a 16:9 ratio.

Two Themes – Dark and Light

You have two choices when it comes to your theme: light or dark. Depending on the topic at hand you might feel that using a white background will look better and be more suitable for the tone or mood. On the other hand, maybe a dark background will help you stand out better and make for a more impressive presentation. We were not completely sure ourselves which one you would prefer, so that is why we created two themes, so you can figure that part out yourself! The most important thing is that they both look really good, right?

Three Colorful Options for Each Theme

On top of giving you dark and light options for your theme, we also created three different color schemes in both the dark and light theme. That comes to a total of six varying theme color possibilities, if you are keeping score at home. The options you have are red/yellow, purple, and blue. Blue is always a safe bet for more formal kinds of projects and presentations, while purple, red and yellow are a bit more edgy. But maybe edge is what you are looking for? We want to make certain that you have all the options you need to select the best looking theme possible for your presentation. Of course if you have a totally different color in mind you can easily edit the colors of presentation to the color of your choice.

Tons of High Quality Images Included

As we have pointed out before, you should absolutely avoid using cheesy stock images at all costs.  There is a good reason that we decided to take care of finding images for you; too many times we have seen people fall victim to picking out weird looking or downright dumb stock images. So we have made sure to include tons of sleek looking commercial free images throughout the entire template. You do not have to trawl endlessly through Google Images or Shutterstock to find good pictures for your presentation; we have done that for you! Besides saving you a ton of time from having to search for the images yourself, we have also ensured that you have nothing to worry about copyright infringement (accidental or otherwise) because all the images we have used in the slide templates either came free to download or we bought the rights to them.

That means that you, too, have the rights to them. Which means that you can edit them as you please At your fingertips are hi-res photos that make for elegant slide backgrounds, or practical stock images that look great as part of your design. It’s all up for you to decide.

And if you want to swap out images it’s super simple. We’ve even included a handy “Help Guide” that shows you how step-by-step. More on that further down below.

Tons of Easy to Edit Vector Graphics

There are tons of captivating graphics in this template; everything from presentation graphics to customer analysis data boxes is included. Our designers have made it as simple as possible to pick and choose the vector that best fits your presentation. What’s awesome is that you can easily change the size and colors of the graphics DIRECTLY IN POWERPOINT (no additional software needed), so you don’t need to be some smarmy graphic designer with many years of experience messing around with slides (leave that part to us). When you find the right vector graphics for our presentation it is really easy to insert display text, change the color of the vector, or manipulate the size or placement according to your needs.

Over 500 Ready to Use and Easy to Edit Vector Icons

Oh man, we busted our butts on this one FOREVER. The template is filled with sleek and modern looking icons; in fact, we have included a set of over 500 icons that you can choose from. Since the icons are vectors, you can also easily modify the icons by changing the color and size.

You should really see the variety of icons we have available! We pretty much thought of every possible presentation topic or scenario that you would be in when we were cobbling together this huge list of icons. To name but a few:

  • General Icons
  • Technology Related Icons
  • Payment Related Icons
  • Web Related Icons
  • Location Related Icons
  • Arrows and Direction Related Icons
  • Weather Related Icons
  • Social Media Related Icons
  • And Much More

Two Free Fonts That Go Together Perfectly

You gotta have a good header/display font combo if you’re gonna properly rock your presentation. We picked two fonts that go really well together: Bebas Neue and Calibri. We have been talking about Bebas Neue for years (OK, maybe since last year)! The font rocks and simply had to be in our template. It also sounds kind of funny. We’ll wait while you say it out loud and then laugh because we’re right.

So even though Bebas Neue is a pretty sweet lookin’ font, bro, it does not come with the Microsoft Office suite. Does that mean you have to pay for it? Absolutely not! Bebas Neue is a FREE font that can be easily be downloaded from Font Squirrel. Don’t worry we walk you through how to easily install the font step-by-step with our handy Help Guide that is included with the presentation template.

Bebas Neue also goes really well with Calibri which is a font that already comes with PowerPoint. That means you do not need to waste extra time searching for the right font combo, you do not to spend money on paying for the right font, and you get to focus on creating the baddest PowerPoint presentation possible.

If for some reason your heart is set on a different font (just please not Times New Roman), you can always change up the fonts accordingly. Just use your best judgment—in case you are stuck for good font recommendations, you can always shoot us a quick email or refer to the many blog posts we have written for guidance on making the right choice.

A Clickable “Choose Your Own Adventure” Options Menu

Remember those “Choose Your Own Adventure” books from the 1980s? Those were pretty sweet! You got to go on a mountain climbing expedition or step through a time warp portal and explore a future dystopia controlled by weird dolphin alien hybrid creatures! We took a fresh approach to template design by allowing the template to have a “Choose Your Own Adventure” table of contents. While you can’t end up on the slopes of Mt. Everest or in the slippery clutches of not-so-benevolent dolphin aliens with our table of contents, picking and choosing the perfect PowerPoint slide is now as easy as ever. With this format you can easily jump to any of the 12 sections in the template by clicking on any of the tiles on the slide. Clever right?

How this works in practice is pretty neat. Let’s say that you, the co-founder of a startup selling cool new coffee roasting machines, have to give a pitch presentation to a big tech incubator in San Francisco. In this case, you may find it important to skip to the yourgreat company bio section, since you are so new and people will want to know who you are and what your company was founded to do (in this case sell quality coffee roasting products). You will also want to talk about your strategy for growth, your target demographics, and discuss who you see as the competition. In that case you will probably want to take your audience through our pre-designed slides for “Introduction,” “Our Team” (maybe just you and your co-founder), “Customer Analysis,” “Business Analysis,” and of course a good “Closing” slide to deliver a strong finish. The nice thing about the clickable table of contents is that you can skip to any section in the presentation with a single click of the mouse. No more fumbling through the entire deck to find the particular section you are looking for.

Parallax Scrolling

Parralax scrolling is an innovative trend in web design that has been around for a number of years now but has recently become quite vogue. In case that term sounds familiar but you aren’t quite sure what parallax is: it’s a technique where background images move down the screen more slowly than foreground images, which creates a sensation of depth and adds to your user’s immersion and heightens their viewing experience. We implemented this style into several slides throughout the presentation, because it would be kind of selling you short to create an aesthetically pleasing slide template set but not give you beautiful and elegant animation effects to complement it and make it really come alive. This technique adds a new dynamic layer to the slides, and it is the sort of subtle detail that will give your presentation an extra bit of oomph.

Here are a few examples of our parallax scrolling in action, in case you are curious:


Over here, you can see how this slide fills in the agenda for a meeting with horizontally moving topic headers, filling in one below the other. Once the first slide is full, there is a vertical sliding transition to move down the image (don’t you just love these minimalist urban cityscape photos?), followed by the same horizontal topic headers. Parallax is the epitome of smoothness and having these slides at your disposal will only make you and your team look smoother.


For this “Why Work With Us?” slide you can see a few different animations happening. First of all, each one of the talking points fills in vertically up the screen. Then once the talking points have all filled into place, the screen slides vertically in the reverse direction that the talking points were appearing in. It’s smooth and just looks too darn cool!

Clever Animations and Transitions

Almost every slide has clever animations and transitions that made the slide pop even further.

You have to see them live to truly appreciate them. The benefit of animations is that they help introduce the elements of the slide one at time, creating visual separation and letting you carry on your talking points at a rate that is more comfortable for your audience. It also makes it easier for your audience to follow along, since they are not being bombarded with the entire presentation slide all at once.

Not to mention, these animations also look really cool (at least we think so). It’s not like there are any weird Windows 98 PowerPoint animations in here; everything is slick and tasteful (in other words, no shimmering text or images that bounce around your screen before settling into the right place). Of course, you might think that they can get a bit distracting, so if you don’t want the animations you can easily turn them off.

Here’s some more examples of the templates cool animations, just because we feel like it:



Look at how awesome these are! You are practically guaranteed to have someone come up to you after you finish your presentation – which you will probably rock – and ask you how you thought of all these nifty animations and graphics. Then you can just wink at them and say you have a really great design team.

Easy to Understand Help Guide

In case you are stuck with customizing things the way you want, we have put together an easy to follow help guide that shows you step-by-step how to customize the template to fit your needs. Everything from messing around with vector graphics to replacing all the images can be found in the Help Guide. If for some reason the help guide does not answer your question, don’t forget that your questions might already be answered here or on other blog posts on this website. The only thing that does not come with the help guide is actual, real life customer support. Oh wait! We’ve got that too . . .

Fast Customer Support

While this template is EXTREMELY easy to edit and should prove to be the best presentation tool you have at your disposal, our team of highly trained and PowerPoint-savvy customer service pandas provides fast and agile support to answer questions you may have. We make our absolute best effort to reply to all queries within 24 hours during the week, although if you have a question for us on the weekend it will have to wait until Monday, because pandas get kind of grumpy when they have to head into the office on Sundays. No one wants to deal with grumpy pandas; we’re sure you understand.

Conclusion

So, you’ve heard our spiel about how this new PowerPoint template is going to do amazing things for your presentation.

It’s got oodles of great features and content! You have over 200 custom-made slides that cover everything from your company bio to your portfolio for sharing case studies to easily editable infographics and vectors that look awesome and are so much cooler than old fashioned pie charts and bar graphs (but those come with the package too if you need them). The slides come adapted to two main size formats so that you have perfectly proportioned slides and handouts for your audience.

There are three total color combinations to customize your theme with, so that it looks and feels right. Hundreds of high quality images come included in the template and ready to use as they are or edit as you please. There are many awesome looking and completely editable vector graphics for you to use, plus over 500 icons that suit literally every possible topic imaginable. You will not have to go searching on the internet for other icons to use in your presentation!

You also get the lovely font combination of Bebas Neue and Calibri to grace the text of your slides, a really easy pick and choose menu of slide templates in twelve different categories, beautiful parallax scrolling to wow your audience along with stunning transitions and animations for an elegant and enhanced viewing experience, not to mention first-class customer support from a team of design professionals who handle any queries with efficiency and urgency.

By now you are hopefully asking where you can get this excellent set of awesome slides. You can download the Influencer template on Graphic River today by clicking here. It will save you tons of time and make your next presentation stand out from the rest of the mediocre presentations out there today. You can use the template as much as you like, forever, so think of it as a good investment in your future business endeavors.

Alright then, it sounds like a good investment! But how much is it going to cost to get? Aren’t these things supposed to be expensive? Not in this case. Which is pretty amazing when you think about it – when we have clients who hire us to create custom-made one-use presentations the cost runs into the thousands of dollars. Whereas downloading the Influencer template – the last presentation template you will ever need, ever — only costs you $20. How much would you be willing to pay to crush your next presentation? Wouldn’t you hand over $20 for that extra bit of confidence to know you had a kickass designed PowerPoint presentation?

We’ll stop the sales schtick now; you know what to do! See you at the finish line and best of luck with your next presentation!

Click here to download the Influencer PowerPoint Template right now!

Presentation tips - Check out my ebook Slides Made Slimple Now!

11
jul

Déjà vu? 10 Different Ways to Design the Same Type of Slide

Nothing makes a presentation panda happier than variety—variety in choices of bamboo, napping spots, and of course, presentation slides. Sometimes the best way to learn how to design good looking slides is to see many examples of the same type of slide, which is what we’re going to be doing today. Here are 10 examples of slides from Graphic River that represent different ways of designing more or less the same type of slide.

In this post we are going to look at 10 different ways to design a “services slide” which is very common in investor pitch type presentations and other sorts of slides where you’re trying to convince someone to give you lots of money or just impress them in general. Keep in mind that all of the images in this presentation are sample templates found within Graphic River. If there are any slides that capture your imagination you can click on the image to be taken to the full template where you can download it through Graphic River. FYI, if you find a template that you fall in love with, they run about $12-$35—definitely an investment worth making!

Example #1: Orange is the Neue Black

There is something bright, bold and jazzy about using orange as a  primary color in anything, whether it is your Lamborghini sports car, your frosted corn flakes cereal mascot, or your presentation slide. Orange says bright colors and bright ideas, and when you combine it with some super clean Bebas Neue font (one of my personal favorites), you have a combination that pretty much cannott go wrong.
With the simple, flat design scheme and elegantly crafted yet minimalistic images and vectors, you can tailor your slide to convey all sorts of great info in a sleek, sexy manner that will be sure to impress your clients and nail sales. Over a super bold orange background we have six tiles, arranged 3 x 2, with an eye-catching title in black and white. A slim black horizontal line subtly breaks up the frame from title:subtitle to the rest of the body, ensuring an easy-on the eyes transition from top to bottom. One simple image in each box catches your attention, and the inclusion of a black box in the upper middle part of the body really stands out and provides dramatic contrast for your spresentation slide. You can download this slide here.

Example #2: Blu

Blu, like the Italian language which it comes from, conveys a sense of sophistication, grace and elegance that are synonymous with great graphic design and slide presentation. Blu is all about keeping things simple and straightforward, with just a touch of class to make things look good.

Here, simple flat icons are laid horizontally across a midnight hued background. Blue is the motif that pulls things together; everything is consistently blue, from the vector elements to the text in the title and subtitle, as well as the logo in the bottom left corner and the slide scrolling arrows in the bottom right arrow.  Each section is clearly marked off with different boxes, which are done in a light whitish-blue color that compliments the deeper blue used elsewhere on the slide. In the title section, the use of pure white is especially eye-popping compared to the dark background; it’s a good example of using “pure” colors sparingly to stand out against weaker or contrasting primary and secondary colors. The consistent blue color throught the slide makes the slide look sleek and polished, as opposed to the possible visual confusion that would arise if you tried putting in too many colors (but do not get the wrong idea—you can definitely use more than one color in a slide and make it look great, as you will see in the next slide). You can download this slide here.

Example #3 Polychrome

Sometimes you have to be a little bit fresh, a little bit creative, if you want to really grab someone’s attention. The Polychrome slide does a little bit more than binary colored slides, and with lots of color going on here, there is plenty of energy to go around. Simple, flat icons are easy on the eye with just enough sharpness to draw attention from one section to another. The icons are casually overlaid on top of a blurred background image, which creates a focal point for the text and icons.

Here, the focal point of the slide is the sequence of multicolored images, each with their own color and stylized design. Notice also how the boxes around each body match the color used in the designs—a small yet important complimentary detail. A little bubble in the bottom right corner counts of which slide number this is, and while the title section is not too crazy, it still calls attention by means of an enlarged font and a subtle horizontal color bar just beneath it. The only thing I would be careful with on this slide is not to include too much text—the current slide is a bit wordy, which makes reading the information a bit of a squinting exercise. As a friendly reminder, try not to put so many words on your slide presentations in the first place! You can download this slide here.

Example 4: Diamonds are Forever

As a famous James Bond villain once said, diamonds are forever. They look great around women’s necks, not so great on rappers’ teeth, but really, really great on slides like this one. This unique looking diamond display makes for a smart, simple looking presentation slide that is sure to get you attention.
The focus on large icons—in this case flat design fonts, which you should check out in this really helpful post—immediately draws the attention of your viewers, and the small text makes the icons stand out more and really pop out from the slide. It all comes together with a simple dark background that brings out the light blue colors utilized in the icons. Together with a text that ranges somewhere between gray and mauve, you have a slide that is maximized for visual impact. Naturally, this a great slide to promote big, grandiose ideas, and then to break them down on following presentation slides into bite-sized pieces for your audience. I would definitely recommend this template if you’re looking for a kickass opening slide, or perhaps a conclusion slide to wrap up your ideas into one nice piece. Like diamonds, this presentation slide’s value is priceless. You can download this slide here.

Example #5 Diagram Tree

Pop quiz: when you first looked at this slide, where did your eyes go first? One of the great aspects of this presentation slide is that its format is ideal for bringing your audience visually through a slide, from one idea to the next. The different topics branch off, sort of like a tree, and each branch sprouts some kind of brilliant idea related to whatever it is you’re talking about.

Once again, flat design keeps things simple and elegant—no need to go crazy with 3D design when you can render icons perfectly in two dimensions. The categories of your presentation are shown in a unique format that allows more negative space to fill the picture and make it easier for your audience to follow along. This slide presentation template was made for a good laser pointer, and also definitely not the sort of slide where you would ever want to use more than a word or two beneath each image. The whole point of a minimalistic, negative space design such as this one is to keep things as clean as possible, so if you’re going to use this template (I can’t recommend it enough!) make sure that you’re not overloading this sort of slide with anything more than a tiny bit of info on screen; the vast majority of it should be conveyed off-screen. You can download this slide here.

Example #6 Ze Venn Diagram

I’m not too sure who Venn was, but it’s always fun to pretend that whoever invented the namesake diagram with those fun circles came from some strange foreign country where people say “ze” instead of “the” and they create diagrams with circles instead of the usual grids. What first catches my attention when I view this slide is the red circle, which stands out immensely from the other two circles, which are varying shades of gray. This is a prime example of how color (red) and position (center) can create contrast and make certain elements on a slide stand out. Doing so directs the audience’s attention, and when you combine great composition and color with (hopefully) good content, you’ve got a winning formula.

Anyways, what we have here is a perfect example of using a really creative type of infographic within a presentation slide setting. Venn diagram style can come in handy particularly if you want to show that your services are related or to demonstrate which features or benefits are included with different types of signup packages that you offer. The simplistic minimalistic icons here make it an absolute beauty of a slide to play with—it is pretty remarkable what you can do when you have a stripped-down design to play with, rather than a bunch of extra unwieldy images and boxes that distract your audience but do not really add any additional useful information. You can download this slide here.

Example #7 Quadripartite

Here is perhaps one of the simplest yet most straightforward presentation slides yet. This design scheme revolves around square thumbnails, features a sleek black background with a very light texturing (check out this post for lots of awesome background ideas), and all the image placeholders are nicely aligned with the text on the slide. The result is a presentation slide that might not win many points in terms of “wow” factor, but it will certainly be one of the simplest to read. And frankly, as one of my fashionista friends once told me, if you are trying to impress someone you can never go wrong with black (or in this case charcoal gray), but you can definitely mess up if you try wearing something a bit more colorful.

That’s basically what is happening here: the quadripartite design gets straight to the point, while the yellow accenting keeps things from getting too dull (although it wouldn’t hurt to just go black and white and really keep the look here as minimalist as possible). You can download this slide here.

Example #8 The Bold Minimalist

If you have a weak spot for minimalist themes when it comes to apps or websites, this is probably the presentation slide for you. It doesn’t get much better than this: you have a beautiful, slightly blurred background (bonus points for picking a landscape with fog, which adds to the blurriness), in addition to bold, popping color icons in the foreground and simply designed information bars at the top and also along the bottom.

The key here is composing a slide that is harmonious based on several important factors. You need to pick a background that is beautiful but ideally contains either muted colors or desaturated so as not to distract from the bright icons in the immediate foreground. Your icons should preferably be flat, but most importantly should conform to the minimalist style that is present throughout the slide. You should also take good care here to use a much, much bigger font than what is currently on display—and that means cutting down on word usage, because it’s simply unacceptable to have a slide with so many words, especially when they are as illegible as these are! You can download this slide here.

Example #9 Les Visages

Ah, stock images—to be used sparingly for sure, they are usually the bane of my existence. There are two exceptions, however: When Vince Vaughn is in them. Also, this presentation slide does a good job using a stock image without making it front and center and turning the whole slide into a joke (which is what normally happens when you use stock images).

The slide here uses an engergetic stock photo background that doesn’t look overly cheesy (for once!). But thankfully, the focus of this slide is not on the stock photo, but on the big, bold text in the foreground, accompanied by simple flat design icons (you should by now realize that flat is the way to go), and four bold colors that lie adjacent to each other along the color spectrum. It’s pretty darn in sync, and if you have an especially corporate audience or business setting to present to, this slide might not be a bad choice. You can download this slide here.

Example #10 New York ‘89

Oh man, this slide makes me excited. I can’t quite put my finger on it, because there are several features that are so cool. First of all, the really unique layout here is awesome. It’s anything but traditional—the opposite of the linear design you see so often. Everything is spaced out somewhat randomly, and the gorgeous graphics make it a pleasure to let your eyes dance around the slide. Colorful flat images here combine nicely with a great font called Lobster (you can get it here for free).

So what is happening here, other than there’s a bunch of random hipster design icons that scream (at least to me) New York City just before the 1990s happened (ignoring the tablet and laptop, forgive me)? That’s the beauty of this slide: so much is happening that you can really tell a story here. I think this would be a great choice for a startup in a creative field pitching to an incubator or VC board—a great showcase of creativity that is almost explosive, and the sort of slide that, with a good dusting of charisma (that means you), should help you absolutely nail your presentation. You can download this slide here.

Conclusion

So, I hope you have some bright ideas for your next big presentation—there are so many different presentation slides out there, and one of them is bound to fit the sort of aesthetic you’re looking for. The purpose of this article was to showcase how there many different ways to design the same kind of slide, and I hope after reading this you will keep at least one of these templates in mind.

Speaking of which, out of these templates, do you have a favorite? What exactly caught your eye? Share in the comments below!

Lastly, do you have a friend that could benefit from learning about these presentation design tips? If so, email them the link to this post.

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Hungry for more information on presentation design trends? Here are some suggested articles:

5 Presentation Tools That Will Make Your Slides Stand Out

7 Presentation Design Trends You Need To Know About

10 Professional Presentation Templates That Don’t Suck

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